Tourmaline

Tourmaline presents a multitude of colors. Red, yellow, blue, green, black or multicolored, this fine stone is highly prized in jewelry.

Much sought-after, red tourmaline owes its color to lithium. It is known as rubellite. While ruby is the most coveted shade, it also comes in red pink with a dash of violet. Its inclusions of air bubbles, channels or milky spots are appreciated, as long as there are not too many of them and they do not prevent the refraction of light. It comes from Brazil, Madagascar, and Mozambique.

Discovered in Malawi in 2000, yellow tourmaline completes the range of existing colors. Highly sought-after in canary yellow, this fine stone is also extracted in Brazil, Madagascar, Tanzania, and Sri Lanka. It has a brown base.

Frequently used by jewelers, green tourmaline is prized for its emerald green, yellow green, olive green, brown green, dark green, or pale green variants. It is extracted in Brazil, Pakistan, Mozambique, Madagascar, and Nigeria.

Blue tourmaline ranges from turquoise to indigo blue. Mazet Joaillerie possesses a piece weighing more than 80 carats. It is sourced from deposits in Brazil, Nigeria, and Afghanistan in particular. Recently discovered in 1987, Paraiba is the finest of tourmalines. Blue tourmalines are rarely large in size. In this instance, while they offer an extremely beautiful color, they reach record sums and do not feature on the current trading market.

Also used in jewelry, black tourmaline displays an extremely deep black color that is completely opaque. Little known, it is sourced from Brazil or Madagascar.

Also known as watermelon, polychrome or two-tone tourmalines, multicolored tourmalines are green on the outside and red pink on the inside. They are included in many Mazet Joaillerie designs. Their distinctive feature is to reveal different colors as they grow. Extremely widespread, they are extracted from deposits in Brazil, Sri Lanka, and Madagascar.

Tourmalines present a hardness of 7 to 7.5 on the Mohs scale.