Ruby

Ruby is considered to be the queen of precious stones. Always red and extremely rare, it is one of fine jewelry’s privileged resources. From the corundum family, it owes its characteristic color to the chromium in its composition. Purple with a dash of blue, “pigeon’s blood” is the most highly prized shade.

Like emeralds, the intensity of the color determines the ruby’s quality. The many mineral or liquid inclusions (channels) that it contains in no way impair its quality, as long as they maintain its transparency. They are even proof of its authenticity.

Long confused with spinels and garnets due to their red color, rubies come for the most part in small sizes. Ruby’s rarity also makes it expensive in pieces of jewelry craftsmanship. Frequently chosen in the creation of engagement rings, this precious stone has adorned the finery and jewels of major royal courts and Indian maharajahs. In addition to its exceptional beauty, jewelers appreciate its ease of setting.

The deposits of the finest rubies are found in Myanmar’s Mogok region. The red gem is also extracted from mines located in Thailand, Mozambique, Kenya, Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan, and Vietnam. Just like sapphire, ruby presents a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale.